Global cyber-attack: ransomware locks computers worldwide: BBC News Review reviews

July 16, 2023



A virus has locked thousands of government, company and public service employees out of their computers.

The global cyber-attack started on Friday and continued across the weekend.

Neil and Dan teach you how to use the language the world’s media is using to discuss this story:

Vocabulary

surge
a sudden increase

ransomware
a virus designed to stop a computer working unless money is paid

stopped in its tracks
stop moving or doing something suddenly

[Cover image: GETTY IMAGES]

For more, visit our website: http://www.bbc.co.uk/learningenglish/english/course/english-you-need/unit-15/session-2

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26 Comments
  1. Kindly add more videos to this series.

  2. love from India

  3. hello guys i watch your all videos in everyday ..your videos are very helpful ..I start from beginning but know I can speak well..thank you alot to all team

  4. Reply
    Radheshyam yadav English speaking course July 16, 2023 at 11:13 pm

    thanks

  5. in his tracks or in his tracks ???

  6. thank you for useful lesson.

  7. What a great job you gentlemen are doing for the enrichment of knowledge of fellow beings is really really marvelous I appreciate your effort great job done👌👌👍

  8. Reply
    张繁若法律民工 July 16, 2023 at 11:13 pm

    thanks for the lesson.

  9. Awesome, guys! I'm from Brazil, and practice a lot on your channel!
    Thanks for all! Good job!

  10. This section is my favourite! Thank you!

  11. Thank you for your work! Interesting and actual words 🙂

  12. Reply
    Damrongdet Arromsit July 16, 2023 at 11:13 pm

    Thank You so much!!

  13. if video has subtitle will better for me

  14. NEIL: Hello, and welcome to news review, the program where we show you how to use the language from the latest news story in your everyday English. Hi, I’m Nail, join me today is Dan.
    DAN: Hello
    NEIL: So, Dan, What’s our story?
    DAN: It’s a story about a global virus. But it won’t make you sick.
    Neil: A virus that won’t make you sick. Very interesting. Let’s find out more from this BBC World Service News Bulletin.
    EXPETS IN CIBER SECURITY ARE WARNING OF A POSSIBLE NEW WAVE OF MALWARE ATTACKS AROUND THE WORLD WHEN PEOPLE RETURN TO WORK AFTER THE WEEKEND.
    MORE THAN 120,000 SYSTEMS IN ABOUT A HUNDRED COUNTRIES ARE ESTIMATED TO HAVE BEEN INFECTED ON FRIDAY.
    THE DISRUPTION HAS HIT USERS INCLUDING GOVERNMENT OFFICES, CAR MANUFACTURERS, BANKS AND HEALTH SERVICES.
    THE MALWARE PREVENTS ACCESS TO COMPUTER DATA AND DEMANDS A RANSOM TO LIFT THE BLOCK.
    DAN: So starting at last Friday and continuing through the weekend, a nasty computer virus has infected and spread across a large number of countries through their computer system. This has affected major organizations including governments, health services and industry. The virus blocks access to the computer.
    NAIL: OK, well, this has been a massive story over the last few days. You’ve been scanning News websites and looking for the words and expressions people need to understand and to be able to talk about this story. And what have you found?
    DAN: I certainly have. So, I found : SURGE, RANSOMWARE and Stopped in its tracks.
    NAIL: SURGE, RANSOMWARE and Stopped in its tracks. OK, let’s start with that first one, DAN. What’s the headline?
    DAN: So, our fist headline comes from INDEPEDENT and says: CYBER ATTACK: FEARS OF SURGE IN RANSOMWARE INFECTIONS AS PEOPLE RETURN TO WORK ON MONDAY.
    NAIL: Ok, so , SURGE there, meaning sudden increase.
    DAN: Exactly, Suddenly and greatly increasing it. And it’s very related to water. Think of the expression a tidal surge. This is when the seawater suddenly rises on to the land. Nobody expected it.
    NAIL: OK, we don’t just use it when we talk about water this days don’t, do we?
    DAN: No we don’t. We also talk about power as in electricity surge in power. What might that happen?
    Nail: Yeah, so, for example, when there is a TV program that huge numbers of people are watching at the same time, that say, a football match, (uhh, uhh) and it’s a half time or there is a break for the adverts, a lots of people in the United Kingdom at least will make a cup of tea, and put on their kettles and there will be an electricity surge.
    DAN: Exactly like that. And we can also do, surge of emotion, like a surge of joy, a surge of interest. Prices may surge due to economic factors. And of course people, Yeah, a sudden move of people, like OXFORD CIRCUS at rush hours.
    NAIL: YEAH, yes for example, our nearest tube there’s a underground train system, ahh, in London its Oxford Circus, it’s one of the busiest in the city, yeah, and going home time. Ahh there’s a surge of people. Sometime they have to shut the gates to stop too many people trying to get down into that tunnel.
    DAN: It also can use as a verb. So as well as saying the surge of people pushing in to the station, we can say, the people surge in to the station. And as a general rule of thumb, we use surge plus in within noun, and surge plus of, within mushroom.
    SURGE , A SUDDEN INCREASE
    -THE SURGE OF PEOPLE PUSHED ONTO THE TRAIN.
    -SINCE JAMES BOND WORE OUR SUIT, WE HAVE SEEN A HUGE SURGE IN SALES.
    NAIL: Ok, thanks for that. Our next headline… are with the word RANSOMWARE.
    DAN: Our second headline comes from the BBC NEWS and says: MICROSOFT WARNS RANSOMWARE CYBER-ATTACK IS A WAKE-UP CALL.
    NAIL: Ok, so RANSOMWARE: A virus design to stop a computer working unless money is paid.
    DAN: YES, It is very nice word and it is a “PORTAMENTO” which means, it’s two words smash together to make one word. We actually heard another one in the bulletin. It was a malware. Malware is a combination of the word malicious meaning bad or evil and ware coming from software, which is a computer program. Ransomware is like malware. Except that ransomware is more specific, we use ware from software and we have ransom as in the money you must pay to return the victim of a kidnapping.
    NAIL: YES, Ok, uhm, this is a, an extremely modern word, in fact I think I’ve never use this word until about three days ago, and now it ‘s everywhere, which is a great thing about news review, we can take this words (from the cutting edge vocabulary), YEAH, so, it’s been around few years however (That’s right).
    DAN: Because of the current level of technology, this kind of program and this kind of malware, this viruses, is there emerging more and more, you wouldn’t have heard this a twenty, thirty years ago. It’s just didn’t exist. But brand new modern word.
    RANSOMWARE A VIRUS DESIGNED TO STOP A COMPUTER WORKING UNLESS MONEY ISPAID.
    -THE RANSOMWARE REQUIRED 100 TO UNLOCK THE COMPUTER FILES.
    -SO FAR, NO ONE HAS FOUND A WAY TO BYPASS THE RANSOMWARE WITHOUT PAYING.
    NAIL: OK, ransomware. NEXT our final headline.
    DAN: A final headline comes from NEWS.COM.AU and says: MARCUS HUTCHINS NAMED AS MAN WHO STOPPED GLOBAL CYBER ATTACK IN ITS TRACKS.
    NAIL: Ok, so, stopped in its tracks, stop moving or doing something.(that’s right) Suddenly. YEAH, ok. Now a bit confused dear DAN, you know how it is. (I do, tell me). I thought tracks were marks that you made on the ground when you walked.
    DAN: Exactly that, and you’re right. Tracks are the footsteps that you leave in a soft substance on the floor. For example, snow, now imagine you are walking through a forest in the snow and every step you take you leave a footprint . These are your tracks. They show you, where you’ve been, where you may be going, however, suddenly, you see a bear. What do you do? You stop! You stop in your tracks, your feet are in exactly the last position that they were. (YEAH) And this is a, quite common. It’s a sort of a surprise move, things like that, people get stopped in their tracks.
    NAIL: So, why are we using this, to talk about softwares, pieces of malicious software?
    DAN: Well, because is the abrupt halt of the computer virus, and the spread, somebody found the way to stop it, moving forward. (YEAH), if it helps, I have another story that is related, but may or may not be true, this of it like this: trains run on tracks, they show where the trains is being, where the trains will be going. If I want to stop the train to robber it, I need to stopped it in its tracks on my push over a tree and it will abruptly stop the train from moving forward.
    NAIL: Ok, very usefully expression used widely (that’s right). Uhm, Have you ever been stopped in your tracks, DAN?
    DAN: I have once, yes, my wife stopped in my tracks, first time I saw her, actually. I come around the corner and I saw her for the first time, and she hit me a bit like a train. Love at first sight.
    STOPPED (SOMETHING) IN ITS TRACKS
    STOP MOVING OR DOING SOMETHING SUDDENLY
    -THE ROBBER WAS STOPPED IN HIS TRACKS WHEN THE POLICE SURROUND HIM.
    -I WAS STOPPED INMY TRACKS BY THE SIGHT OF HER.
    NAIL: WOW, DAN, before this catchs you, “marche” I think we need to move on to our facebook challenge. (right). OK, so: ransomware as we’ve discussed it is a portamento word meaning a word made from two other words but together. WHICH TWO WORDS FORM THE WORD RANSOMWARE: OK. SO We’ve put that out there on facebook and the options were:
    A) RUN and SOMEWHERE
    B) RANSOM and BEWARE
    C) RANSOM and SOFTWARE
    NAIL: what were the responses?
    DAN: AGAIN, the responses were overwhelmingly positive. I think we’re gonna have to stop writing…(making it harder)…So everybody who said the answer is C, you were correct…
    …well done…
    …well done…
    DAN:…..and everbody else who said C. Good job everbody.
    NAIL: Yes, well done, and DAN now can you just recap the words we’ve been looking at today.
    DAN: Certainly, the firs word we had was SURGE, which is a sudden increase. Then, ransomware, a virus design to stop a computer working unless money is paid. And finally, stopped in its tracks which is stop moving or doing suddenly.
    NAIL: Yes, well , we’re gonna have to stop this program in its tracks, cause we’ve run out of time, but if you’d like test yourself on today’s vocabulary, there’s a quiz you can take on our website bbc learning english . com we can find all kind of other videos and activities to help you improve your English. Thank you for joining us and goodbye.

    Sorry if you find something wrong, but it was the best I could do. (Roberto Nogueira from Brazil )

  15. 5 people are not happy about cyber-attack!!!

  16. Hello and welcome to News Review the program where we show you how to use the

    language from the latest news stories in your everyday English.

    Hi, I'm Neil, joining me today is Dan. "Hello"
    So, what's our story?

    It's a story about a global virus but it won't make you sick.

    A virus that won't make you sick. very interesting, let's find out more from this

    world service news bulletin.

    So, starting on last Friday and continuing through the weekend, a nasty computer

    virus has infected and spread across a large number of countries through their

    computer systems. This has infected major organizations including government and

    health services and industry. The virus blocks access to the computer.

    Ok,well, this has been a massive story over the last few days. you've been

    scanning the news websites and looking for the words and expressions people need

    to understand and to be able to talk about this story.
    So, what have you found?

    I certainly have. so, I found "surge","ransomware" and "stopped in its tracks"

    surge, ransomware and stopped in its tracks
    Ok, let's start with our first one, Dan. what's the headline?

    So,our first headline comes from The Independent and says.
    "Cyber attack: Fears of surge in ransomware infections as people return to work

    on Monday"

    Ok, so, "surge" there meaning a sudden increase.

    Exactly, suddenly and greatly increasing. and it's very relate to water.
    Think of the expression a title surge. This is when the sea water suddenly rises

    on to the land, nobody expected it.

    Ok, We don't just use it when we talk about water these days though, do we?

    No, we don't, and you can also talk about power as an electricity.
    "surge in power" when might that happen?

    Yeah, so, for example, when there was a TV program that a huge numbers of people

    were watching it at the same time. let's say it a football match.
    and it's a half time where there's a break for the adverts.
    Lots of people in the United Kingdom at least will make a cup of tea and put on

    their cattles and there will be an electricity surge.

    Exactly like that. and we can also do surges of emotion ,like a surge of joy.
    a surge of interest. prices may surge due to economic factors.
    and of course people, a sudden movement of people like oxford circus at a rush

    hour.

    Yes, for example, our nearest tube that's under ground train system in London
    is Oxford Circus. It's one of the busiest in the city and going home time,

    there's a surge of people sometimes they have to shut the gate.
    They stop too many people trying to get down into that tunnel.

    It can also be used as a verb ,so, as well as saying the surge of people pushing

    into the station. we can say the people surged into the station.

    and as a general rule of form, we use surge + in with noun, and surge + of with

    an emotion.

    Ok, thanks for that, our next headline with a word "ransomware"

    Our second headline comes from BBC news and says
    "Microsoft warns ransomware cyber-attack is a wake-up call"

    Ok, so, ransomware, a virus designed to stop a computer working unless money is

    paid.

    Yes, it's a very nice word and it's a portmanteau which means two words smash

    together to make one word and we actually heard another one in the bulletin, it

    was "malware", malware is a combination of the word malicious meaning bad or evil

    and ware coming from software which is a computer program.
    ransomware is like a malware except ransomware is more specific we use "ware"

    from software and we have ransom as in the money you must pay to return the

    victim of kidnapping.

    Yes, this is an extremely modern word. in fact, I think I've never used this word
    until about three days ago and now it's every where which is a great thing about

    news review. we can take these words.

    From the cutting edge of vocabularies.

    And yes so, it's been around a few years however.

    That's right, because of the current level of technology, these kind of

    programs,this kind of malware, this virus there is emerging more and more.
    You wouldn't heard of this saying twenty thirty years ago. it just didn't exist.
    but a brand new modern word.

    Next, final headline.

    Our final headline comes from News.com.au and says
    "Marcus Hutchins named as man who stopped global cyber attack in its tracks"

    Ok, so, stopped in its tracks. stopped moving or doing something suddenly.

    Ok, now I'm a bit confused, Dan. You know how it is. "I do, tell me"
    I thought tracks were marks you made on the ground when you walked.

    Exactly that and you're right. tracks are the footsteps you leave in soft

    substances on the floor.
    ((* I think Dan was trying to say "ground" *))

    for example ,snow. Imagine you were walking through a forest in the snow and

    every step you take leave a foot print. these are your tracks that show you where

    you've been and you may be going, however you see a bear. what do you do? You

    stop. you stop in your tracks with your feet exactly last position where they

    were.
    and this is a quite common, it's a sort of surprise move things like that.
    people get stopped in their tracks.

    So, why are we using this to talk about a software piece of malicious software?

    Well, because it's the abrupt, halt of the computer virus and spread.
    Somebody found a way to stop it moving forward.
    and if it helps I had another story that's related but it may or may not be true.
    Think of it like this, trains run on tracks. they show you where trains has been,
    and where it will be going, If I want to stop the train to rob it, I need to it

    in its tracks, and I might push over a tree, and it'll abruptly stop the train

    from moving forward.

    ok, very useful expression used widely. ummm Have you ever been stopped in your

    tracks, Dan?

    Ahhh, I have once yes. my wife stopped me in my tracks, first time I saw her

    actually. I came around corner and saw her for the first time and she hit me a

    bit like a train. ( )

    =========================================
    I assume Dan must've got a great dinner time with his wife at a day this program

    was on air on youtube. Dan is handsome and wise man. 🙂

    this is my personal transcript for the news review
    If you liked it , please hit the thumbs up button down below.
    Everyone in the world no matter who you are and where you live in, I wish you

    have a good day.
    and see y'all next week with next awesome episode.
    have a great day.

  17. Thank you so much.

  18. thankyou ! really advance my english skill

  19. What's the idiot put dislike?
    thanks for new video <3

  20. Pure Gold. Keep it up, love also your podcasts..

  21. helpful

  22. Thank you BBC

  23. you already did a lesson of news review about the word "Surge". Please check it out!

  24. Reply
    Teacher Marcia Figueiredo July 16, 2023 at 11:13 pm

    Thanks!!

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